Anchor Systems Used in Rope Rescue
"It All Starts Here... If These Blow-Out, You Are Screwed! "

Anchors are the foundation on which we build our rescue systems. Rescuers must quickly decide on an appropriate anchor system for a given rescue situation. Usually, anchors need to be in place before other aspects of the rescue can proceed. Determining where anchors should be built and beginning their construction early are critical steps in timely rescue operations. 

Anchor selection is a vast topic and could go on for hours, days, and even weeks. Excellent judgment, experience, practice, and insight all play a part in quality built anchors. 

Not all anchors are created equal. The practical use of anchors ultimately is designed and engineered with "purpose" in mind. We'll briey touch on ve general categories of anchors now and go into greater depth later in this course.

  • Anchors as Systems
  • ​Anchor Selections
  • ​Single Point Anchors
  • ​Tensioned Anchors
  • ​Staggered and Marginal Anchors
  • ​Back-Up, Extensions and ReDirect Anchors
  • ​Removable Anchors
  • Multi Point Anchors
  • ​Tensionless Anchors
  • ​Slack Anchors
  • ​Load Sharing Anchors
  • Load Distributing Anchors
  • ​V Anchors
  • ​Canyoneering Anchors

Teaching anchors and systems? 

This system will launch your team into another level of competency!!

"It doesn't get any easier than this"
-Bill Newsome

How about the ebook and a toolbox thrown in?

6 stellar courses that will remove every piece of confusion you and your team have with respect to anchoring.

You learn concepts related to canyons, cliffs, and structures, but who knows what other elements we'll add to this course. Yes, they all require knots, hitches and bends for connections, but there are so many ways to approach this topic, it's one we can have a ton of fun with. So, stay tuned for any additions to 
the content and enjoy! 

Inside The Anchors and Knots Toolbox

Seasoned Professionals Give Their Insights and Secret Sauce!

Anchors
Anchors are the foundation on which we build our rescue systems. Rescuers must quickly decide on an appropriate anchor system for a given rescue situation. Usually, anchors need to be in place before other aspects of the rescue can proceed. Determining where anchors should be built and beginning their construction early are critical steps in timely rescue operations.
Elevated Anchor Systems
The use of elevated anchors (i.e. high directional anchor systems) is a mandatory requirement of NFPA 1670 for rope technicians. Having said this, it’s impossible to discuss one facet of rope rigging and not address all the many other aspects at the same time. A rope system is like a living breathing thing; like any living thing, it's composed of many cells and body parts. Yes, these many parts are separate components, but without a realization of the whole body, each component means little. This is the essence of the knowledge base that rope rescue technicians must try to ascend to.

Knot Craft

What are knots, bends, and hitches? The standard definition of a knot is a rope intertwined with itself, a bend is the intertwining of two ends of rope, and a hitch is a knot that is dependent on a host object. In the true spirit of the art of knot craft, defining knots deserves a little more than “intertwined rope!”

Personal Skills & Climber Rescue
Personal skills include, among other things, rappelling, ascending fixed lines, single body belay techniques, pick off skills, and rope management. We’ll cover most of these topics through this course. There are, however, a few like pick-offs that will be covered in more depth in other courses.
Introduction to Two Tension Rope Systems w/Artificial High Directionals Mini-Course
This course was specifically designed around the needs of one the finest technical ropes I have ever worked with (Volcano Rescue Team) and most certainly on the West Coast. A heavy focus was placed on the use and construction of the Arizona Vortex, a new piece of equipment for the team. In conjunction with artificial high directional work, a large amount of two tension rope systems, knot craft, and high angle offsets are covered. All of these together allowed for a class delivered around the cutting edge of high-angle rescue techniques currently being used by the industry. 
Canyoneering: Anchors and Rigging
Yes, you heard us right -- it depends! The answer is really more of a "change of direction." Most often, people new to canyoning or canyoneering aren't really sure what they are getting into. 
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